Tag: Financial Services

The difference between a front-end and a back-end debt-to-income ratio for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, Fannie Mae


The difference between a front-end and a back-end debt-to-income ratio for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan FHA, VA, KHC, USDA, Fannie Mae
You should know what you can afford before beginning your search for a home. This enables you to
focus on realistic choices and saves you time and effort.
This section will show you how to calculate the amount you comfortably can spend for a home. What
is the difference between a front-end and a back-end debt-to-income ratio?
Before making a loan, the lender wants to be certain the borrower has the ability to repay. Before
approving your mortgage loan application a lender will look at several factors to gauge the risk
you pose as a borrower. There are two calculations your lender makes when determining your level of
indebtedness.

Monthly debt obligations are the primary benchmark used to determine whether the borrower will be able to meet the expenses involved in home ownership. Housing expense is considered one of several components that make up the total debt-to-income ratio benchmark; there is not a separate housing-to-income benchmark unto itself.
Maximum Debt Ratios
Maximum ratios are 31%/43% for manually underwritten loans.
Note:

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>What NOT To Do After You Apply for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval


>What Not To Do

What NOT To Do After You Apply for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval

Congratulations! You applied for your loan and maybe you finally found the house of your dreams. You made a bid, had it accepted by the seller, and went through the mortgage application process. It looks like you’ll qualify. The closing is only weeks away, and you are feeling pretty good.

It’s smooth sailing from here, right? Probably. However, more than one buyer has had the wind taken out of his sails at this point in a real estate transaction. If at all possible, steer clear of the following “NO-NOs” until AFTER you have gone to settlement.

· Do not take on new debt or apply for new credit cards. The temptation is strong. There are so many big purchases people potentially want to make in connection with a move: appliances, window treatments, furniture, etc.. When you add to this the fact that, today, everyone offers easy terms and no money down – well, why not just do it? Answer: because you will change what the industry calls your “back-end ratios” ( the relationship of your income to your debt). It could also lower your credit score.

· Do not be difficult to reach. The loan officer or processor may need to reach you for additional information or documents. Check your voice mails and emails often. Check your junk email file also. Communication is the key to a smooth closing.

· Do not quit your job, change jobs or take a leave of absence. If at all possible, try not to make a career move during the time between your mortgage application and the closing on the home you are purchasing. But, you ask, “What if it is a BETTER job, for MORE money, in a DIFFERENT field?” Still, try and wait until AFTER closing. One of the factors mortgage companies consider is length of present employment; they are partial to stability. At the very least, changing jobs initiates the need for more paperwork, and maybe a delay in closing.

· Do not stop paying your bills. Pay all your bills on time including rent or mortgages.

· Do not pack too soon. Well, go ahead and pack your clothes and pictures. But, do not pack away your bank statements, tax returns, or other important paperwork. Most especially, do not pack away your checkbook! More than one buyer has had closing delayed while a friend or relative hurried over with additional funds because the checkbook was in the moving van.

· Do not lease a new car. This should go under the general heading of “no new debt”. It is highlighted here because, for some strange reason, many buyers do run right out and lease a new car during the intervening time between mortgage application and closing! As with any debt, this will change your “back-end ratios”, and may cause you not to qualify for your mortgage.

· Do not throw away pay stubs, bank statements, or other financial documents.

· Do not spend your money needed for closing.


· In short, do nothing that negatively impacts your ability to qualify for your mortgage loan, or initiates a new round of paperwork.

These suggestions are merely that – suggestions. No one is saying, flat out, that bad things will necessarily follow if you do any of the above. They are offered as cautions. Many buyers seem to view the mortgage application procedure as an static entity, a snap shot of their financial lives at a given moment in time. It is not. It is an on-going process that can take into account everything you do right up until the day of closing.

What NOT To Do After You Apply for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval

Louisville Kentucky Primary Mortgage Market Survey Results from Freddie Mac


Louisville Kentucky Primary Mortgage Market Survey Results

September 15, 2011

30-Year Fixed Rate Mortgages US NE SE NC SW W
Average 4.09 4.11 4.16 4.12 4.13 4.01
Fees & Points 0.7 0.6 0.8 0.6 0.8 0.9
15-Year Fixed Rate Mortgages US NE SE NC SW W
Average 3.30 3.32 3.31 3.29 3.37 3.25
Fees & Points 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.4 0.7 0.6
5/1-Year Adjustable Rate Mortgages US NE SE NC SW W
Average 2.99 3.03 2.95 3.13 2.96 2.90
Fees & Points 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.8 0.6
Margin 2.74 2.75 2.75 2.72 2.76 2.73
1-Year Adjustable Rate Mortgages US NE SE NC SW W
Average 2.81 2.85 2.72 3.13 2.70 2.68
Fees & Points 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.5
Margin 2.76 2.80 2.75 2.72 2.77 2.75
The National Mortgage Rate Snapshot One Year Ago One Week Ago
  30-YR 15-YR 5/1-YR 1-YR ARM 30-YR 15-YR 5/1-YR 1-YR ARM
Average 4.37   3.82   3.55   3.40   4.12   3.33   2.96   2.84  
Fees & Points 0.7   0.6   0.6   0.7   0.7   0.6   0.6   0.6  
Margin N/A N/A 2.74   2.77   N/A N/A 2.74   2.76  

Louisville Kentucky Mortgage Market Survey

Freddie Mac’s Primary Mortgage Market Survey (PMMS) is for informational purposes only and Freddie Mac is not responsible for business decisions made based on the reported results of the PMMS. In general, the data presented were calculated from information collected Monday through Wednesday of the same week that the PMMS is released and may not reflect mortgage rates, fees or points currently available from any lender. Freddie Mac may change the methodology used to conduct the PMMS at any time and without notice.

KHC’s First Mortgage Government Loan Products


KHC’s First Mortgage Government Loan Products

Federal Housing Administration (FHA)

Minimum 640 credit score required.

Financing to 96.50% of lesser of sales price or appraised value.

All KHC DAPs and other KHC-approved secondary financing may be used.

Maximum 6% seller-paid items.

Maximum ratios of 40/45 with AUS approval.

28 for HUD’s full policy.

All borrowers must be scored by TOTAL and receive approve/eligible or accept/accept.

Lender must follow the FHA maximum mortgage limits for particular area

see https://entp.hud.gov/idapp/html/hicostlook.cf

just follow Upfront and Annual Mortgage Insurance Premiums Guidelines (see information below).

Upfront and Annual Mortgage Insurance Premiums

Loan Terms Greater than 15 Years

Case numbers on or after Monday, April 18, 2011

LTV less than or equal to 95%

1% annual 1.10 monthly

LTV greater than 95%

1% annual 1.15 monthly

Conventional

Minimum 660 credit score required

Maximum loan-to-value (LTV) ratio is 80%.

Maximum ratios 40/45 with AUS approval.

No down payment assistance products may be used. Borrower must meet down payment requirements with their own funds or a gift.

Federal Home Loan Bank monies allowed once borrower meets the 20% down payment requirement. Must be entered as subordinate

financing in DU/LP.

Pre-purchase education required as per AUS findings.

Not available for manufactured housing.

Appraiser Independence required (see page 4).

KHC does not presently have a product for 81% LTV or greater.

Rural Housing Services (RHS)

Minimum 640 credit score required.

Financing to 100% of the appraised value, plus guarantee fee of 3.5%.

All KHC DAP programs and other KHC-approved secondary financing may be used.

No maximum on seller-paid items.

Ratio requirements and guarantee fee per agency guidelines.

KHC will accept Government Underwriting System (GUS) findings, including reduced documentation and, with approval, expanded

ratios up to 40/45.

Veteran’s Administration (VA)

Minimum 640 credit score required.

Ratios up to 40/45% with AUS Approval.

Financing to 100% of the lesser of the appraised value or sale price.

All KHC DAP programs and other KHC-approved secondary financing may be used.

Maximum 4% seller-paid items.

Follow agency guidelines for ratio requirements and funding fee.